Research has shown that having a pet can help with depression symptoms. In addition to helping ease mild symptoms of depression, pet companionship can also ease feelings of loneliness, encourage exercise (in turn improving physical health), and help improve feelings of worth. You may be wondering, “If I’m managing symptoms…

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A phobia is an intense and irrational fear reaction to a person, place, object, or situation. A person with a phobia may experience a panic attack or feelings of dread when they encounter the trigger, and their feelings of fear are out of proportion to the actual danger that exists.…

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A psychiatric nurse practitioner is a registered nurse who has completed additional continuing education and training in psychiatric (mental health) nursing. Psychiatric NPs have a graduate-level (a master’s degree) or doctorate-level degree.  Psychiatric nurse practitioners work autonomously and can do the same things as psychiatrists, including prescribing medication. Nurse practitioners…

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Psychiatrists and psychiatric nurse practitioners are mental health providers that evaluate, diagnose, and treat patients with mental and behavioral disorders. In many ways, their roles in patient care overlap. So, what’s the difference between the two?  Their Educational Background and Training  A psychiatrist is a medical doctor (MD) who completed…

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TMS (transcranial magnetic stimulation) may show some promise for individuals who struggle to lose weight. Obesity is associated with serious health complications that are considered the leading causes of death in the US, including heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and certain types of cancer. (1) Obesity is a public health…

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Therapist, psychologist, and psychiatrist are three terms that are often easily confused. While these mental health providers all work closely with their patients to improve mental health, they each have different educational backgrounds and may play different roles in treatment.  Below, we take a look at each profession to help…

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The CDC tells us that roughly 18.4% of adults aged 65 years and older experience depression.(1) Although depression is less common in older adults than in younger adults, suicide rates are higher among older adults. Depression in older adults is often misdiagnosed or undertreated, meaning they don’t get the care…

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Recently, a patient shared their story with us, and gave us permission to share it with you. Finding the right depression treatment can transform a person’s life, and for those patients who haven’t seen results with medication and talk therapy, TMS can be the solution they never thought they’d find.…

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